Waimamaku Service Station, Hokianga

by | New Zealand, Photography

Waimamaku Service Station, Hokianga

Tim, one of four brothers, in his car. “It does get the attention of people,” he told me. And I guess, so does Tim.

Waimamaku Service Station, Hokianga

Bruce (the boss) doing what he does best.In 1984. Bruce Sims & Robert Bright purchased the business in a very rundown state. Almost 40 years later and with a lot of renovations, the service station is in pristine condition—a living, breathing museum. 

Waimamaku Service Station, Hokianga
Waimamaku Service Station, Hokianga
Waimamaku Service Station, Hokianga
Waimamaku Service Station, Hokianga

Toia telling the story of the Waimamaku Service Station. She’s also a volunteer fire fighter.

Waimamaku Service Station, Hokianga
Waimamaku Service Station, Hokianga
Waimamaku Service Station, Hokianga

The Waimamaku Service Station started life as a service car garage in late 1927. The first kerbside pumps fuel contract was with Shell Company of New Zealand Ltd, in 1928. In 1934, the building was brought and general repairs were added.

Waimamaku Service Station, Hokianga
Waimamaku Service Station, Hokianga

The Waimamaku Service Station is reputed to be New Zealand’s oldest service station. 

Waimamaku Service Station, Hokianga
Waimamaku Service Station, Hokianga
Waimamaku Service Station, Hokianga

The first owner of the service station used to sleep up in the “attic”. A trip up the ladder gets you to the top. When the original owner was to be married, he decided that his wife-to-be couldn’t live there. He put off the marriage until he got a proper house. The attic is now used to store tyres. 

Waimamaku Service Station, Hokianga
Waimamaku Service Station, Hokianga

Still in the attic: A pin up calendar from the last century. 

Waimamaku Service Station, Hokianga

Working cars on the shop floor.

Waimamaku Service Station, Hokianga

Various advertising posters were made for Capstan cigarettes, including one to encourage female workers in factories during World War II to smoke Capstan to relax at the end of a working day. One of the most well-known slogans at the time was “Time for a Capstan”. This signage may date back to the year, 1941.

Waimamaku Service Station, Hokianga
Waimamaku Service Station, Hokianga

This historical signage was donated to the service station. 

Waimamaku Service Station, Hokianga

Yes, it is the last stop for a fair distance. Shortly after you pass this service station, you hit the Waipoua Forest. There’s no cell coverage in the forest, so if you’re stuck, you’d have to depend on someone passing by.

Waimamaku Service Station, Hokianga

The original phone number is still on the front signboard.